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Records with Subject: Education
Illustrating Molecular-Level Phenomena and Molecular Simulation Techniques with Commonly Used Software
Rachel Getman
August 24, 2019 (v1)
Subject: Education
Keywords: Chemical Reaction Engineering, Intermolecular Forces, Matlab, Microsoft Excel, Molecular simulations, Molecular-level phenomena, Monte Carlo, Python, Quantum Simulations, WebMO
While topics in the chemical engineering curriculum generally involve the macroscale, e.g., focusing on process design and optimizations, many of the grand challenges facing chemical engineers today involve molecular level chemistry. Having an appreciation for molecular-level phenomena will better prepare chemical engineers to handle problems in energy, water, food, catalysis, advanced materials, and other fields. In this presentation, we discuss homework/project problems that we have developed for use in the Material and Energy Balances, Separations, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics courses that explore molecular level phenomena and molecular-level simulation approaches. Specifically, these problems focus on intermolecular interactions, connections between molecular configurations and macroscopic observables, how molecular level properties control material performance, and simulation strategies that enable exploration of the molecular level. An aim of the assignments is to demonstrate sim... [more]
Poster: Graphical User Interfaces as Chemical Engineering Educational Tools in University and Informal Learning Environments
Ashlee N. Ford Versypt
July 30, 2019 (v1)
Subject: Education
Keywords: Computational science, Curriculum, Education, Graphical user interface, Modelling, STEM Outreach
This presentation discusses the development and use of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) as cyber-assisted educational tools for instructing and engaging undergraduate chemical engineering students, training graduate students for computational research in science and engineering, and introducing lay audiences to chemical engineering concepts in informal learning environments outside of the classroom. A GUI encapsulates computational software within a visual environment where users can provide interactive input through brief text or point-and-click controls and display query or simulation results through an automated process without needing to learn a programming language or specific commands. MATLAB and Python are two popular software environments for science and engineering used in many university chemical engineering programs worldwide. Both provide excellent user support for rapid development of professional-quality GUIs by engineering educators, academic researchers, and science and... [more]
Graphical User Interfaces as Chemical Engineering Educational Tools in University and Informal Learning Environments
Ashlee N. Ford Versypt
July 30, 2019 (v1)
Subject: Education
Keywords: Computational science, Curriculum, Education, Graphical user interface, Modelling, STEM Outreach
This presentation discusses the development and use of graphical user interfaces (GUIs) as cyber-assisted educational tools for instructing and engaging undergraduate chemical engineering students, training graduate students for computational research in science and engineering, and introducing lay audiences to chemical engineering concepts in informal learning environments outside of the classroom. A GUI encapsulates computational software within a visual environment where users can provide interactive input through brief text or point-and-click controls and display query or simulation results through an automated process without needing to learn a programming language or specific commands. MATLAB and Python are two popular software environments for science and engineering used in many university chemical engineering programs worldwide. Both provide excellent user support for rapid development of professional-quality GUIs by engineering educators, academic researchers, and science and... [more]
Toward Integrating Python Throughout the Chemical Engineering Curriculum: Using Google Colaboratory in the Classroom
Alexander Dowling
July 21, 2019 (v2)
Subject: Education
Keywords: Active Learning, Cloud Computing, Data Analysis, Numerical Methods, Python, Statistics, Undergraduate
Computing and data science skills are without doubt extremely valuable for modern (chemical) engineers. Big data, machine learning, predictive modeling, decision science and similar terms are ever-present in job posting, scientific literature, funding announcements, and popular news. Yet, many chemical engineers lack a background in the fundamentals of computer programming, applied statistics, and mathematical modeling for problem solving. Often, student excitement in data-centric topics manifest through self-study with tutorials, extracurricular projects, and online classes whereby students assemble a toolbox of skills but do not learn the fundamentals that transcend each technique.

In this contribution, I will discuss our ongoing efforts at the University of Notre Dame to create a coherent, integrated strategy for computing and data analysis in the undergraduate curriculum. A key focus is retooling the sophomore-level “Numerical and Statistical Analysis” course (required) to provi... [more]
Modernizing the Undergraduate Process Design Curriculum
Thomas Alan Adams II
July 20, 2019 (v1)
Subject: Education
Keywords: Curriculum, Education, Modelling, Process Design, Process Synthesis, Simulation
In this talk, I give an overview of the chemical engineering curriculum at McMaster University as it relates to the 1.5 year process design sequence. The courses outside the design sequence were recently restructured and redesigned to create an environment with more modelling and algorithmic thinking/algorithmic problem solving. This includes a statistics course and a big data / machine learning course. The end result is that the design sequence is able to focus on state of the art tools and methods for process design because students receive many fundamental principles before the design sequence begins.
Announcing the 2019 Processes Travel Awards for Post-Doctoral Fellows and Ph.D. Students
Michael A. Henson, Juergen Hahn, Martha A. Grover, John D. Hedengren, Processes Editorial Office
April 15, 2019 (v1)
Subject: Education
In order to support the development of early career researchers involved in chemical and biological process/systems engineering, Processes launched the second Travel Awards for Post-doctoral Fellows and Ph. [...]
Transforming Instruction to Chemical Product Design
Ka M Ng, Warren D Seider
July 11, 2018 (v1)
Subject: Education
Keywords: Innovation, Product Design, Teaching Assessment, Technology Platforms
This paper describes the progress of our efforts to lead the CACHE (Computer Aids for Chemical Engineering Education) Task Force in transforming from chemical process design toward chemical product design. Through CACHE, we are coordinating the development of a library of product-design case studies. Beginning with preliminary product designs created previously over several semesters, we are arranging for faculty experts, knowledgeable in the underlying technology platforms, to work with student groups to enrich the product designs. Over a 3-year period, a collection of approximately 25 case studies is being prepared. This article describes the research envisioned as innovative product designs are created, both egarding applications of new technologies, and product design evolution/evaluation; and in advancing strategies for teaching product design. The anticipated use of these case studies in departments worldwide for design courses taught by similar technology experts, just a few in... [more]
Blackout! Classroom Edition
Jake Nease, Thomas A. Adams II
June 13, 2018 (v1)
Subject: Education
Keywords: Classroom Workshop, Electricity Grid, Energy Markets, Game Theory, Open Source, Video Game
Blackout! Is a classroom game (suitable for middle school and up to and including university students) which simulates open electricity markets. Up to eight players compete on the open market to build power plants, bid on sale prices, and deliver the most electricity to their customers. Demand changes each turn (one simulation hour) over the course of a day. The game helps to teach about the trade-offs between different kinds of power plants, such as cost (capital cost vs. operating cost), reliability (thermal vs. renewables), flexibilty (such as base-load vs. peaking power), and so on. The current version includes wind, solar, nuclear, coal, and natural gas based power plants. Also included in this submission are sample workshop materials (i.e. instructional slides) useful in a classroom setting. Please see also the linked academic research article discussing the statistical outcomes of using the game with middle and high school students.
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