Postdoctoral fellowship in Computer-Aided Materials Design

Prof. Ricardez-Sandoval at the University of Waterloo writes to us with the following:

The Department of Chemical Engineering (ChE) at the University of Waterloo invites applications from qualified candidates for a 12 month postdoctoral fellowship appointment in Computer-Aided materials design under the supervision of Professors Luis Ricardez-Sandoval and Eric Croiset.

The project involves a research collaboration with a multinational industrial partner in the Oil & Gas sector interested to evaluate the performance of new process using microkinetic modelling principles. The candidates for this position must have solid expertise in computer programming, chemical reaction engineering and heterogeneous catalysis, demonstrated expertise in microkinetic modelling of chemical reactions, in particular using Kinetic Monte Carlo methods, and first-principles calculations using off-the-shelf software such as VASP. A Ph.D. degree and evidence of excellence in research are required. Successful applicants are expected to maintain an active program of research in areas closely related to computer-aided materials design. Applications should include a cover letter describing their interest in the position and the candidate’s background in the areas, a curriculum vitae and research statement and at least three reference letters.

Prof. Sandoval notes that there is no deadline to apply to this position and candidates will be evaluated until the position is filled. The selected candidate is expected to start working on the project at their earliest convenience. Interested individuals should send their application to Luis Ricardez-Sandoval (laricard@uwaterloo.ca) and Eric Croiset (ecroiset@uwaterloo.ca). The salary for this position will be similar to that offered by the NSERC postdoctoral fellowship program and commensurable with the background and activities to be developed by the applicant. Only applicants that fit the profile outlined above for this position will be contacted.

Thomas A. Adams II

Professor of Chemical Engineering at McMaster University