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Records with Keyword: Fermentation
Case Study of Anaerobic Digestion Process Stability Detected by Dissolved Hydrogen Concentration
Daniela Platošová, Jiří Rusín, Jan Platoš, Kateřina Smutná, Roman Buryjan
January 24, 2022 (v1)
Keywords: amperometric sensor, anaerobic digestion, dissolved hydrogen, Fermentation, rotary bioreactor
The paper presents the results of a laboratory experiment of mesophilic single-stage anaerobic digestion performed to verify the possibility of early detection of process instability and reactor overload by evaluating the course of dissolved hydrogen concentration of the main intermediate. The digestion process was run in a Terrafors IS rotary drum bioreactor for 230 days. The substrate dosed on weekdays was food leftovers from the university canteen. At an average temperature of 37 °C, an organic loading of volatiles of 0.858 kg m−3 day−1 and a theoretical retention time of 259 days, biogas production of 0.617 Nm3 kg VS−1 was achieved with a CH4 content of 51.7 vol. %. The values of the established FOS/TAC stability indicator ranged from 0.26 to 11.4. The highest value was reached when the reactor was overloaded. The dissolved hydrogen concentration measured by the amperometric microsensor ranged from 0.039−0.425 mg dm−3. Data were statistically processed using Pearson’s correlation c... [more]
Study on the Extraction Technology of Candida antarctica Lipase B by Foam Separation
Wenyao Shao, Ying Lin, Yinghua Lu
September 16, 2021 (v1)
Subject: Biosystems
Keywords: enrichment ratio, Fermentation, foam separation, lipase, recovery rate, surfactant
Candida antarctica Lipase B (CALB) has a wide range of applications in many fields. In this study, Pichia pastoris was used to express CALB for fermentation tank culture. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used as a surfactant, and foam separation technology was used to explore the best experimental conditions for the harvest of CALB. The results showed that the optimal technological conditions for the foam separation and recovery of CALB were as follows: liquid volume was 150 mL, separating gas velocity was 600 mL/min, pH value was 7, and surfactant SDS concentration was 0.5 mg/mL. Under these conditions, the enrichment ratio of CALB was 0.95, and recovery rate R was 80.32%, respectively, indicating that the foam separation technology is feasible to extract lipase B.
The Effect of Deinking Process on Bioethanol Production from Waste Banknote Paper
Omid Yazdani Aghmashhadi, Ghasem Asadpour, Esmaeil Rasooly Garmaroody, Majid Zabihzadeh, Lisandra Rocha-Meneses, Timo Kikas
June 21, 2021 (v1)
Keywords: biorefinery, enzymatic hydrolysis, Fermentation, lignocellulose, pretreatment, zero-waste
The aim of this paper is to study the effect of reinking and pretreatment of waste banknote paper on its usability in the bioethanol production process. To this end, the tensile strength of worn banknote paper was first studied at different pH values. The sample with the lowest tensile strength was considered for the next sections. In the deinking process, NaOH at different concentrations (1%, 2%, 3%, and 4%) and in combination with ultrasonic treatment was applied. After deinking the pulp, two acidic and alkaline chemical pretreatments with concentrations of 1%, 2%, 3%, and 4% were used independently and in combination with ultrasonic. Enzymatic hydrolysis, following fermentation with Scheffersomyces stipitis, and crystallinity measurements were used to confirm the efficiency of the pretreatments. RSM Design Expert software was used to determine the optimal values by considering the three variables—enzyme loading, ultrasonic loading, and contact time for waste paper deinked (WPD) and... [more]
Aspen Plus Simulations of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol Separation and Recovery Processes
Giancarlo Dalle Ave, Thomas A Adams II
April 27, 2021 (v1)
Keywords: 2-ethyl-hexanol, Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol, Aspen Plus, Decane, Decanol, Extracton, Fermentation, Hexanol, Oleyl Alcohol, Simulation
This is a collection of Aspen Plus v8.8 Simulation Files that were used to conduct the research published in Dalle Ave G, Adams TA II, "Techno-economic comparison of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol fermentation using various extractants", Energy Conversion and Management, Volume 156, 15 January 2018, Pages 288-300. The LAPSE postprint of this work is available at LAPSE:2018.0132.

Each simulation file contains a flowsheet model of the process to recover acetone, butanol, and ethanol from the ABE fermentation broth for the following case studies:

1. Direct distillation of the ABE Broth
2. Product extraction and purification from ABE Broth using 2-Ethyl-1-Hexanol
3. Product extraction and purification from ABE Broth using Decane
4. Product extraction and purification from ABE Broth using Decanol
5. Product extraction and purification from ABE Broth using Hexanol
6. Product extraction and purification from ABE Broth using Mesitylene
7. Product extraction and purification from ABE... [more]
Production of Hydrogen Sulfide by Fermentation in Rumen and Its Impact on Health and Production of Animals
Ali Mujtaba Shah, Jian Ma, Zhisheng Wang, Rui Hu, Xueying Wang, Quanhui Peng, Felix Kwame Amevor, Naqash Goswami
April 16, 2021 (v1)
Keywords: animal health, Fermentation, hydrogen sulfide, rumen, ruminants
Hydrogen sulfide is a Janus-faced molecule with many beneficial and toxic effects on the animal health. In ruminants, rumen fermentation plays a vital role in the digestion and absorption of nutrients. During rumen fermentation, the production of hydrogen sulfide can occur, and it can be rapidly absorbed into the body of the animals through the intestinal wall. If the production of hydrogen sulfide concentration is higher in the rumen, it can cause a toxic effect on ruminants known as poliomyelitis. The production of hydrogen sulfide depends on the population of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the rumen. In rodents, H2S maintains the normal physiology of the gastrointestinal tract and also improves the healing of the chronic gastric ulcer. In the gut, H2S regulates physiological functions such as inflammation, ischemia−reperfusion injury and motility. In this review article, we summarize the toxicity occurrence in the body of animals due to high levels of hydrogen sulfide production and a... [more]
Impact of Fermentation Processes on the Bioactive Profile and Health-Promoting Properties of Bee Bread, Mead and Honey Vinegar
Rodica Mărgăoan, Mihaiela Cornea-Cipcigan, Erkan Topal, Mustafa Kösoğlu
February 22, 2021 (v1)
Keywords: bee bread, Fermentation, health benefits, honey vinegar, lactic acid bacteria, mead, volatile compounds
Recently, an increasing interest is paid to bee products obtained as a result of the fermentation process. Some of them can be consumed directly (bee-collected pollen, honey, bee bread etc.), while others are the result of lactic and/or acid fermentation (honey vinegar and honey wine). Bee bread is the result of pollens’ lactic fermentation, whereas mead is obtained by honeys’ lactic fermentation. Moreover, as a result of honey acetic acid fermentation, honey vinegar is obtained. Sensory characteristics and aroma composition have been scarcely studied, which may depend on the starter culture and fermentation process. Along with the medicinal properties they are a vital resource for future researches as they are of particular importance in the food market. In this review, we discuss the aroma-active compounds, taste, and sensorial characteristics of fermented bee products along with the approaches that can be developed for the flavor improvement based on existing technologies. Furthermo... [more]
Application of Novel Techniques for Monitoring Quality Changes in Meat and Fish Products during Traditional Processing Processes: Reconciling Novelty and Tradition
Abdo Hassoun, María Guðjónsdóttir, Miguel A. Prieto, Paula Garcia-Oliveira, Jesus Simal-Gandara, Federico Marini, Francesca Di Donato, Angelo Antonio D’Archivio, Alessandra Biancolillo
December 22, 2020 (v1)
Keywords: control, curing, drying, Fermentation, muscle foods, preservation, process optimization, spectroscopy
In this review, we summarize the most recent advances in monitoring changes induced in fish and other seafood, and meat and meat products, following the application of traditional processing processes by means of conventional and emerging advanced techniques. Selected examples from the literature covering relevant applications of spectroscopic methods (i.e., visible and near infrared (VIS/NIR), mid-infrared (MIR), Raman, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and fluorescence) will be used to illustrate the topics covered in this review. Although a general reluctance toward using and adopting new technologies in traditional production sectors causes a relatively low interest in spectroscopic techniques, the recently published studies have pointed out that these techniques could be a powerful tool for the non-destructive monitoring and process optimization during the production of muscle food products.
Model-Based Process Optimization for the Production of Macrolactin D by Paenibacillus polymyxa
Dominik Krämer, Terrance Wilms, Rudibert King
October 6, 2020 (v1)
Keywords: Fermentation, multi-model approach, NIR spectroscopy, nonlinear state estimation, online optimization
In this study, we show the successful application of different model-based approaches for the maximizing of macrolactin D production by Paenibacillus polymyxa. After four initial cultivations, a family of nonlinear dynamic biological models was determined automatically and ranked by their respective Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). The best models were then used in a multi-model setup for robust product maximization. The experimental validation shows the highest product yield attained compared with the identification runs so far. In subsequent fermentations, the online measurements of CO2 concentration, base consumption, and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) were used for model improvement. After model extension using expert knowledge, a single superior model could be identified. Model-based state estimation with a sigma-point Kalman filter (SPKF) was based on online measurement data, and this improved model enabled nonlinear real-time product maximization. The optimization increased... [more]
Production of Ethanol from Hemicellulosic Sugars of Exhausted Olive Pomace by Escherichia coli
Juan Carlos López-Linares, Irene Gómez-Cruz, Encarnación Ruiz, Inmaculada Romero, Eulogio Castro
July 2, 2020 (v1)
Keywords: acid hydrolysate, biorefinery, detoxification, Fermentation, lignocellulosic residue
Exhausted olive pomace (EOP) is the main residue generated in olive oil industries, after the extraction of the residual oil from olive pomace with hexane. This work studies the ethanol production from hemicellulosic sugars of EOP. The fermentability of the sugar solution, resulting from the acid pretreatment of EOP, was evaluated using Escherichia coli SL100, although a detoxification step was required before fermentation. Overliming and activated charcoal detoxification were tested to minimize the presence of inhibitory compounds in the hydrolysate and to achieve a fermentable medium. E. coli assimilated all sugars in both detoxified hydrolysates and achieved ethanol yields of about 90% of the theoretical one. However, the fermentation time was much shorter when the hydrolysate had been detoxified with activated charcoal (20 h versus 120 h).
Optimization and Scale-Up of Coffee Mucilage Fermentation for Ethanol Production
David Orrego, Arley David Zapata-Zapata, Daehwan Kim
June 23, 2020 (v1)
Keywords: bioethanol, coffee mucilage, Fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, second generation biofuels
Coffee, one of the most popular food commodities and beverage ingredients worldwide, is considered as a potential source for food industry and second-generation biofuel due to its various by-products, including mucilage, husk, skin (pericarp), parchment, silver-skin, and pulp, which can be produced during the manufacturing process. A number of research studies have mainly investigated the valuable properties of brewed coffee (namely, beverage), functionalities, and its beneficial effects on cognitive and physical performances; however, other residual by-products of coffee, such as its mucilage, have rarely been studied. In this manuscript, the production of bioethanol from mucilage was performed both in shake flasks and 5 L bio-reactors. The use of coffee mucilage provided adequate fermentable sugars, primarily glucose with additional nutrient components, and it was directly fermented into ethanol using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. The initial tests at the lab scale were evaluate... [more]
In-Situ Yeast Fermentation Medium in Fortifying Protein and Lipid Accumulations in the Harvested Larval Biomass of Black Soldier Fly
Chung Yiin Wong, Yeek Chia Ho, Jun Wei Lim, Pau Loke Show, Siewhui Chong, Yi Jing Chan, Chii Dong Ho, Mardawani Mohamad, Ta Yeong Wu, Man Kee Lam, Guan Ting Pan
May 22, 2020 (v1)
Subject: Biosystems
Keywords: black soldier fly, coconut endosperm waste, Fermentation, larvae, organic waste, protein, yeast
Recently, worldwide researchers have been focusing on exploiting of black soldier fly larval (BSFL) biomass to serve as the feed mediums for farmed animals, including aquaculture farming, in order to assuage the rising demands for protein sources. In this study, yeast was introduced into coconut endosperm waste (CEW) whilst serving as the feeding medium to rear BSFL in simultaneously performed in situ fermentation. It was found that at a 2.5 wt% yeast concentration, the total biomass gained, growth rate and rearing time were improved to 1.145 g, 0.085 g/day and 13.5 days, respectively. In terms of solid waste reduction, the inoculation of yeast over 0.5 wt% in CEW was able to achieve more than 50% overall degradation, with the waste reduction indexes (WRIs) ranging from 0.038 to 0.040 g/day. Disregarding the concentration of yeast introduced, the protein productivity from 20 BSFL was enhanced from only 0.018 g/day (the control) to 0.025 g/day with the presence of yeast at arbitrary con... [more]
Kinetic Modelling of the Coproduction Process of Fumaric and Malic Acids by Rhizopus arrhizus NRRL 1526
Victor Martin-Dominguez, Laura Bouzas-Santiso, Nieves Martinez-Peinado, Victoria E. Santos, Miguel Ladero
April 1, 2020 (v1)
Keywords: biorefinery, Fermentation, filamentous fungi, fumaric acid, kinetic modelling, malic acid
The production of organic acids by biotechnological processes has experienced a notable impulse with the advent of first and second generation biorefineries and the need of searching for renewable and sustainable feedstock, such as biomass. Fumaric acid is a promising biomonomer for polyamide production and a well-known acidulant and preservative in food and feed industries. Malic acid is a well-known food acidulant with a high market share. The biotechnological Fumaric and Malic acid production via fungi of the Rhizopus genus is being explored nowadays as a process for the valorization of food and food-related waste to obtain food ingredients and key platform chemicals of the so-called biochemical biorefinery. In this work, a preliminary study is performed to find reproducible conditions for the production of the acids by Rhizopus arrhizus NRRL 1526 by controlling fungi morphology and inoculum conditions. Afterwards, several production runs are performed to obtain biomass, glucose, an... [more]
Detoxification of a Lignocellulosic Waste from a Pulp Mill to Enhance Its Fermentation Prospects
Tamara Llano, Natalia Quijorna, Alberto Coz
December 10, 2019 (v1)
Subject: Biosystems
Keywords: biorefinery, detoxification, Fermentation, inhibitors, spent sulfite liquor, sugars
Detoxification is required for sugar bioconversion and hydrolyzate valorization within the biorefining concept for biofuel or bio-product production. In this work, the spent sulfite liquor, which is the main residue provided from a pulp mill, has been detoxified. Evaporation, overliming, ionic exchange resins, and adsorption with activated carbon or black carbon were considered to separate the sugars from the inhibitors in the lignocellulosic residue. Effectiveness in terms of total and individual inhibitor removals, sugar losses and sugar-to-inhibitor removal ratio was determined. The best results were found using the cation exchange Dowex 50WX2 resin in series with the anion exchange Amberlite IRA-96 resin, which resulted in sugar losses of 24.2% with inhibitor removal of 71.3% of lignosulfonates, 84.8% of phenolics, 82.2% acetic acid, and 100% of furfurals. Apart from exchange resins, the results of evaporation, overliming, adsorption with activated carbon and adsorption with black... [more]
Optimization of Reducing Sugar Production from Manihot glaziovii Starch Using Response Surface Methodology
Abdi Hanra Sebayang, Masjuki Haji Hassan, Hwai Chyuan Ong, Surya Dharma, Arridina Susan Silitonga, Fitranto Kusumo, Teuku Meurah Indra Mahlia, Aditiya Harjon Bahar
March 26, 2019 (v1)
Subject: Biosystems
Keywords: alternative fuel, bioethanol, Fermentation, hydrolysis, Manihot glaziovii (M. glaziovii), Optimization
Bioethanol is known as a viable alternative fuel to solve both energy and environmental crises. This study used response surface methodology based on the Box-Behnken experimental design to obtain the optimum conditions for and quality of bioethanol production. Enzymatic hydrolysis optimization was performed with selected hydrolysis parameters, including substrate loading, stroke speed, α-amylase concentration and amyloglucosidase concentration. From the experiment, the resulting optimum conditions are 23.88% (w/v) substrate loading, 109.43 U/g α-amylase concentration, 65.44 U/mL amyloglucosidase concentration and 74.87 rpm stroke speed, which yielded 196.23 g/L reducing sugar. The fermentation process was also carried out, with a production value of 0.45 g ethanol/g reducing sugar, which is equivalent to 88.61% of ethanol yield after fermentation by using Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae). The physical and chemical properties of the produced ethanol are within the specifications... [more]
Techno-economic comparison of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol fermentation using various extractants
Giancarlo Dalle Ave, Thomas A. Adams II
June 12, 2018 (v1)
Keywords: Acetone, Butanol, Cost of CO2 Emissions Avoided, Ethanol, Extraction, Fermentation, Technoeconomic Analysis
This work compares various chemicals for use as extractants in second-generation Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol fermentation on economic and environmental bases. Both non-toxic and toxic extractants are considered in this study. The combinative extractive-distillation separation process was modelled using a combination of Microsoft Excel 2013, MATLAB 2015 and Aspen Plus v8.8. Separation trains were designed and optimized for each extractant to best take advantage of extractant properties. Upstream units considered in this analysis include: biomass (switchgrass) solids processing, biomass pre-treatment and saccharification, and fermentation. Downstream processes considered include utility generation and wastewater treatment. The cost of CO2 equivalent emissions avoided (CCA) was used as the metric to compare the environmental impact of each process as compared to conventional petroleum-based gasoline. The economic and environmental best extractant is shown to be 2-ethyl-hexanol with a minimum... [more]
Techno-economic comparison of Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol fermentation using various extractants
Giancarlo Dalle Ave, Thomas A. Adams II
June 12, 2018 (v1)
Keywords: Acetone, Butanol, Cost of CO2 Emissions Avoided, Ethanol, Extraction, Fermentation, Technoeconomic Analysis
This work compares various chemicals for use as extractants in second-generation Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol fermentation on economic and environmental bases. Both non-toxic and toxic extractants are considered in this study. The combinative extractive-distillation separation process was modelled using a combination of Microsoft Excel 2013, MATLAB 2015 and Aspen Plus v8.8. Separation trains were designed and optimized for each extractant to best take advantage of extractant properties. Upstream units considered in this analysis include: biomass (switchgrass) solids processing, biomass pre-treatment and saccharification, and fermentation. Downstream processes considered include utility generation and wastewater treatment. The cost of CO2 equivalent emissions avoided (CCA) was used as the metric to compare the environmental impact of each process as compared to conventional petroleum-based gasoline. The economic and environmental best extractant is shown to be 2-ethyl-hexanol with a minimum... [more]
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